GENERAL


§ 245.1. Definitions.

 The following words and terms, when used in this chapter, have the following meanings, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:

   ASNT—The American Society of Nondestructive Testing.

   Aboveground field constructed metallic storage tank—An aboveground storage tank that is manufactured from either ferrous or nonferrous metals and has final assembly completed at the job site. The term does not include associated piping.

   Aboveground manufactured metallic storage tank—An aboveground storage tank that is manufactured from either ferrous or nonferrous metals and is completely fabricated and assembled in the shop prior to shipping. The term does not include piping.

   Aboveground nonmetallic storage tank—An aboveground storage tank that is manufactured from nonmetallic materials; for example, fiberglass reinforced plastic, composites, plastics, and the like, and is completely fabricated and primarily assembled in the shop prior to shipping. The tank may require some additional final assembly at the job site. The term does not include associated piping.

   Aboveground storage tank—One or a combination of stationary tanks with a capacity in excess of 250 gallons, including the underground pipes and dispensing systems connected thereto within the emergency containment area, which is used, will be used or was used to contain an accumulation of regulated substances, and the volume of which, including the volume of piping within the storage tank facility, is greater than 90% above the surface of the ground. The term includes tanks which can be visually inspected, from the exterior, in an underground area and tanks being constructed or installed for regulated use. The term does not include the following, or pipes connected thereto:

     (i)   A tank of 1,100 gallons or less capacity used for storing motor fuel for noncommercial purposes or motor oil.

     (ii)   A tank used for storing heating oil for consumptive use on the premises where stored.

     (iii)   A pipeline facility, including gathering lines, regulated under:

       (A)   The Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 (49 U.S.C.A. App. § §  1671—1687).

       (B)   The Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 (49 U.S.C.A. § §  2001—2015).

       (C)   An interstate or intrastate pipeline facility regulated under State laws comparable to the provisions of law referred to in clause (A) or (B).

     (iv)   A surface impoundment, pit, pond or lagoon.

     (v)   A stormwater or wastewater collection system.

     (vi)   A flow-through process tank, including, but not limited to, a pressure vessel and oil and water separators.

     (vii)   A nonstationary tank liquid trap or associated gathering lines directly related to oil and gas production or gathering operations.

     (viii)   Tanks which are used to store brines, crude oil, drilling or frac fluids and similar substances or materials and are directly related to the exploration, development or production of crude oil or natural gas regulated under the Oil and Gas Act (58 P. S. § §  601.101—601.605).

     (ix)   Tanks regulated under the Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act (52 P. S. § §  1396.1—1396.31).

     (x)   Tanks used for the storage of products which are regulated under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C.A. § §  301—392).

     (xi)   Tanks regulated under the Solid Waste Management Act (35 P. S. § §  6018.101—6018.1003), including, but not limited to, piping, tanks, collection and treatment systems used for leachate, methane gas and methane gas condensate management.

     (xii)   A tank of 1,100 gallons or less in capacity located on a farm used solely to store or contain substances that are used to facilitate the production of crops, livestock and livestock products on the farm.

     (xiii)   Tanks which are used to store propane gas.

     (xiv)   Tanks containing radioactive materials or coolants that are regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C.A. § §  2011—2297).

     (xv)   Tanks regulated under the act of May 2, 1929 (P. L. 1513, No. 451), known as the Boiler Regulation Law (35 P. S. § §  1301—1500).

     (xvi)   Equipment or machinery that contains regulated substances for operational purposes such as hydraulic lift tanks and electrical equipment tanks.

     (xvii)   A tank that contains a de minimis concentration of regulated substances.

     (xviii)   An emergency spill or overflow containment tank that is expeditiously emptied after use.

     (xix)   Other tanks excluded by regulations promulgated under the act.

   Act—The Storage Tank and Spill Prevention Act (35 P. S. § §  6021.101—6021.2104).

   Actively involved—To perform or to conduct direct onsite supervision or oversight of the minimum number of qualifying activities in §  245.111 or §  245.113 (relating to certified installer experience and qualifications; and certified inspector experience and qualifications) for renewal of installer or inspector certification in each applicable category, within the period in §  245.114(a)(3) (relating to renewal and amendment of certification).

   Adjacent—Next to or contiguous with.

   Affect or diminish—In the context of water supplies, the term has the following meaning: To cause or contribute to a measurable increase in the concentration of one or more contaminants in a water supply above background levels, or to cause or contribute to a decrease in the quantity of the water supply.

   Air Pollution Control Act—The Air Pollution Control Act (35 P. S. § §  4001—4015).

   Ancillary equipment—Electrical, vapor recovery, access or other systems and devices, including, but not limited to, devices, such as piping, fittings, flanges, valves and pumps used to distribute, meter, monitor or control the flow of regulated substances to or from a storage tank system.

   Aquifer—A geologic formation, group of formations or part of a formation capable of a sustainable yield of significant amount of water to a well or spring.

   Background—The concentration of a regulated substance determined by appropriate statistical methods that is present at the site, but is not related to the release of regulated substance at the site.

   Beneath the surface of the ground—Beneath the ground surface or otherwise covered with earthen materials.

   CERCLA—The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C.A. § §  9601—9675).

   Cathodic protection—A technique to prevent corrosion of a metal surface by making that surface the cathode of an electrochemical cell.

   Cathodic protection tester—A person who can demonstrate an understanding of the principles and measurements of common type of cathodic protection systems as applied to buried or submerged metal piping and tank systems. At a minimum, the person shall have education and experience in soil resistivity, stray current, structure to soil potential and component electrical isolation measurements of buried metal piping and tank systems.

   Certification categories

     (i)   Individual certification categories issued to certified installers or certified inspectors to perform tank handling, tightness testing or inspection activities on aboveground or underground storage tank systems and facilities.

     (ii)   The term includes category specific certifications in one or more of the following:

       (A)   Storage tank inspector certification categories:

         (I)   IAF—Inspection of aboveground field constructed and aboveground manufactured storage tank systems and facilities.

         (II)   IAM—Inspection of aboveground manufactured storage tank systems and facilities.

         (III)   IUM—Inspection of underground storage tank systems and facilities.

       (B)   Storage tank installer certification categories:

         (I)   ACVL—Aboveground storage tank system civil installation and modification.

         (II)   AFMX—Aboveground field constructed metallic storage tank installation, modification and removal, and aboveground manufactured metallic storage tank modification.

         (III)   AFR—Aboveground field constructed storage tank system removal.

         (IV)   AMEX—Aboveground storage tank system mechanical installation, modification and removal.

         (V)   AMMX—Aboveground manufactured metallic storage tank system installation and modification.

         (VI)   AMNX—Aboveground nonmetallic storage tank system installation and modification.

         (VII)   AMR—Aboveground manufactured storage tank system removal.

         (VIII)   TL—Storage tank liner installation and modification, and underground storage tank liner evaluation.

         (IX)   UMX—Underground storage tank system installation and modification.

         (X)   UTT—Underground storage tank system tightness tester.

         (XI)   UMR—Underground storage tank system removal.

   Certified company—An entity, including, but not limited to, a sole proprietorship, a partnership or a corporation, which is certified by the Department and employs certified installers or certified inspectors to conduct tank handling activities, tightness testing activities or inspection activities.

   Certified inspector—A person certified by the Department to conduct inspections of tanks or storage tank facilities and who may conduct environmental audits. A certified inspector may not be an employe of a tank owner.

   Certified installer—A person certified by the Department to install, modify or remove storage tanks. A certified installer may be an employe of a tank owner.

   Change-in-service—One of the following:

     (i)   Continued use of a storage tank system to store an unregulated substance.

     (ii)   Continued use of a storage tank system in a manner which would exempt the system from the definition of aboveground storage tank or underground storage tank.

   Clean Streams Law—The Clean Streams Law (35 P. S. § §  691.1—691.1001).

   Cleanup or remediation—To clean up, mitigate, correct, abate, minimize, eliminate, control or prevent a release of a regulated substance into the environment to protect the present or future public health, safety, welfare or the environment, including preliminary actions to study or assess the release.

   Coax vapor recovery—The use of a coaxial fitting to provide Stage I vapor recovery; one orifice for the conveyance of the product to the tank and a second, concentric orifice for venting the tank to the delivery vehicle.

   Combination of tanks—Tanks connected together at a manifold in a manner that they act as a single unit; tank capacity for a combination of tanks is the sum of the individual tank capacities.

   Compatible—The ability of two or more substances to maintain their respective physical and chemical properties upon contact with one another for the design life of the tank system under conditions likely to be encountered in the tank system.

   Connected piping—All piping including valves, elbows, joints, flanges and flexible connectors attached to a tank system through which regulated substances flow. For the purpose of determining how much piping is connected to any individual tank system, the piping that joins two regulated systems should be allocated equally between them.

   Consumptive use—The term means, with respect to heating oil, that which is stored in an aboveground storage tank of 30,000 gallons or less capacity or that which is stored in an underground storage tank and is consumed on the premises.

   Contaminant—A regulated substance released into the environment.

   Containment structure or facility—Anything built, installed or established which comes in contact with regulated substances that are spilled, leaked, emitted, discharged, escaped, leached or disposed from a storage tank or storage tank system. The term includes, but is not limited to, a vault, dike, wall, building or secondary containment structure around an underground or above-ground storage tank, or any rock or other fill material placed around an underground storage tank.

   Corrective action

     (i)   The term includes the following:

       (A)   Containing, assessing or investigating a release.

       (B)   Removing a release or material affected by a release.

       (C)   Taking measures to prevent, mitigate, abate or remedy releases, pollution and potential for pollution, nuisances and damages to the public health, safety or welfare, including, but not limited to, the following:

         (I)   Waters of this Commonwealth, including surface water and groundwater.

         (II)   Public and private property.

         (III)   Shorelines, beaches, water columns and bottom sediments.

         (IV)   Soils and other affected property, including wildlife and other natural resources.

       (D)   Taking actions to prevent, abate, mitigate or respond to a violation of the act that threatens public health or the environment.

       (E)   Temporarily or permanently relocating residents, providing alternative water supplies or undertaking an exposure assessment.

     (ii)   The term does not include the cost of routine inspections, routine investigations and permit activities not associated with a release.

   Corrosion expert—A person who, by reason of thorough knowledge of the physical sciences and the principles of engineering and mathematics acquired by a professional education and related practical experience, is qualified to engage in the practice of corrosion control on buried or submerged metal piping systems and metal tanks. The person shall be accredited or certified as being qualified by the National Association of Corrosion Engineers or be a registered professional engineer who has education and experience in corrosion control of buried or submerged metal piping systems and metal tanks.

   Corrosion protection—The protection of metal from deterioration. The deterioration may be due to a natural electrochemical reaction between the metal and the soil or other electrolyte, or because of stray direct currents.

   De minimis—With regard to products containing regulated substances, the term applies when the regulated substance is of insufficient concentration to be required to appear on a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). The term does not apply to section 507 of the act (35 P. S. §  6021.507) as it pertains to site contamination.

   Dielectric material—A material that does not conduct direct electrical current. Dielectric coatings are used to electrically isolate tank systems from the surrounding soils. Dielectric bushings are used to electrically isolate portions of the tank system for example, tank from piping.

   Electrical equipment—Equipment that contains dielectric fluid that is necessary for the operation of equipment such as transformers and buried electrical cable.

   Emergency containment—A containment structure which serves to convey, capture and contain the total volume of an anticipated release of regulated substance from an aboveground or underground storage tank system and which is expeditiously emptied.

   Environmental audit—Activities which may be conducted by a certified inspector to evaluate the storage tank system or storage tank facility site, equipment and records to determine evidence of an actual or possible release of regulated substance.

   Environmental media—Soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, bedrock and air.

   Excavation zone—The volume containing the tank system and backfill material bounded by the ground surface, walls and floor of the pit and trenches into which the underground storage tank system is placed at the time of installation.

   Exempt underground storage tank—An underground storage tank which has been exempted by regulation from participation in USTIF.

   Existing underground storage tank system—An underground storage tank system used to contain an accumulation of regulated substances or for which installation has commenced on or before December 22, 1988. Installation is considered to have commenced if the following apply:

     (i)   The owner or operator has obtained the Federal, State and local approvals or permits necessary to begin physical construction of the site or installation of the tank system.

     (ii)   One of the following apply:

       (A)   A continuous onsite physical construction or installation program has begun.

       (B)   The owner or operator has entered into contractual obligations, which cannot be cancelled or modified without substantial loss, for physical construction at the site or installation of the tank system to be completed within a reasonable time.

   Exposure assessment—An assessment to determine the extent of exposure of, or potential for exposure of, individuals, the biological community and all other natural resources to releases from a storage tank based on, but not limited to, the following:

     (i)   The nature and extent of contamination and the existence of or potential for pathways of human exposure, including groundwater or surface water contamination, air emissions, soil contamination and food chain contamination.

     (ii)   The size of the community within the likely pathways of exposure.

     (iii)   The comparison of expected human exposure levels to the short-term and long-term health effects associated with identified contaminants.

   Farm—Land used for the production for commercial purposes of crops, livestock and livestock products, including the processing or retail marketing of these crops, livestock or livestock products if more than 50% of these processed or merchandized products are produced by the farm operator. The phrase ‘‘Crops, livestock and livestock products’’ includes, but is not limited to:

     (i)   Field crops, including corn, wheat, oats, rye, barley, hay, potatoes and dry beans.

     (ii)   Fruits, including apples, peaches, grapes, cherries and berries.

     (iii)   Vegetables, including tomatoes, snap beans, cabbage, carrots, beets, onions and mushrooms.

     (iv)   Horticultural specialties, including nursery stock, ornamental shrubs, ornamental trees and flowers.

     (v)   Livestock and livestock products, including cattle, sheep, hogs, goats, horses, poultry, furbearing animals, milk, eggs and furs.

     (vi)   Aquatic plants and animals and their by-products.

   Free product—A regulated substance that is present as a separate phase liquid; that is, liquid not dissolved in water.

   Free product recovery—The removal of free product.

   Gathering lines—A pipeline, equipment, facility or building used in the transportation of oil or gas during oil or gas production or gathering operations.

   Groundwater—Water below the land surface in a zone of saturation.

   Hazardous substance storage tank system

     (i)   A storage tank system that contains a hazardous substance defined in section 101(14) of CERCLA (42 U.S.C.A. §  9601(14)).

     (ii)   The term does not include a storage tank system that contains a substance regulated as a hazardous waste under Subtitle C of CERCLA, or mixture of the substances and petroleum, and which is not a petroleum system.

   Heating oil—Petroleum that is No. 1, No. 2, No. 4-light, No. 4-heavy, No. 5-light, No. 5-heavy and No. 6 technical grades of fuel oil; other residual fuel oils (including Navy Special Fuel Oil and Bunker C); and other fuels when used as substitutes for one of these fuel oils. Heating oil is typically used in the operation of heating equipment, boilers or furnaces.

   Highly hazardous substance tank—A storage tank of greater than 1,100 gallons capacity which contains reportable quantities of substances with CERCLA reportable release quantity of 10 pounds or less, as identified by 40 CFR Part 302 (relating to designation, reportable quantities, and notification).

   Hydraulic lift tank—A tank holding hydraulic fluid for a closed loop mechanical system that uses compressed air or hydraulic fluid to operate lifts, elevators and other similar devices.

   In-service inspection—A scheduled aboveground storage tank external inspection to determine tank system serviceability and compliance with requirements in this chapter and applicable industry standards. This inspection shall be conducted by a Department-certified aboveground storage tank inspector. The tank system may be in operation during this inspection.

   Inspection activities—Activities to inspect all or a part of a storage tank system or storage tank facility. These activities include, but are not limited to, evaluation of:

     (i)   Storage tank system structural integrity.

     (ii)   Construction and major modification.

     (iii)   Facility operation.

   Install—Activities to construct, reconstruct or erect to put into service a storage tank, a storage tank system or storage tank facility.

   Interim certification—Certification granted by the Department on an interim basis under section 108 of the act (35 P. S. §  6021.108) to installers and inspectors of storage tank systems or storage tank facilities.

   Intrafacility piping—A common piping system serving more than one storage tank system within a storage tank facility.

   Large aboveground storage tank—An aboveground storage tank having a capacity greater than 21,000 gallons.

   Large aboveground storage tank facility—An aboveground storage tank facility with greater than 21,000 gallons total aboveground storage capacity.

   Liquid trap—Sumps, well cellars and other traps used in association with oil and gas production, gathering and extraction operations (including gas production plants), for the purpose of collecting oil, water and other liquids. The liquid traps may temporarily collect liquids for subsequent disposition or reinjection into a production or pipeline stream, or may collect and separate liquids from a gas stream.

   Maintenance—The normal operational upkeep to prevent a storage tank system or storage tank facility from releasing regulated substances if the activity involved is not a major modification or minor modification.

   Major modification

     (i)   An activity to upgrade, repair, refurbish or restore all or any part of an existing storage tank system or storage tank facility which:

       (A)   Alters the design of that storage tank system or storage tank facility.

       (B)   May affect the integrity of that storage tank system or storage tank facility.

     (ii)   The term includes an activity directly affecting the tank portion of the storage tank system or an activity directly affecting an underground component of the storage tank system.

   Minor modification

     (i)   An activity to upgrade, repair, refurbish or restore all or part of an existing storage tank system or storage tank facility which does not alter the design of that storage tank system or storage tank facility, but, which may effect the integrity of that storage tank system or storage tank facility.

     (ii)   The term does not include an activity directly affecting the tank portion of the storage tank system or an activity directly affecting an underground component of the storage tank system.

   Modify—To conduct an activity that constitutes a major modification or a minor modification.

   Monitoring system—A system capable of detecting releases in connection with an aboveground or underground storage tank.

   Motor fuel—Petroleum or a petroleum-based substance that is motor gasoline, aviation gasoline, No. 1 or No. 2 diesel fuel or any grade of gasohol, and is typically used in the operation of an internal combustion engine.

   Motor oil—A petroleum product used to lubricate the internal parts of an engine. The term includes lubricating and operational fluids for the mechanical components associated with the engine, including any hydraulic, transmission, gear or braking systems.

   New facility—A storage tank facility which did not exist prior to August 5, 1989.

   Noncommercial purposes—The term means, with respect to motor fuel, motor fuel not for resale.

   Nontank handling project activities—Activities performed by a certified individual, certified company or employee of a certified company on a project that may not be tank handling activities, but are part of the certified individual’s or company’s responsibility while completing tank handling or inspection activities on a storage tank system project.

   OSHA—Occupational Safety and Health Administration—The agency established under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (29 U.S.C.A. § §  651—678).

   On the premises where stored—With respect to heating oil, the term means tank systems located on the same property where the stored heating oil is used.

   Operational life—The period beginning when installation of the tank system has commenced until the time the tank system is properly closed.

   Operator—A person who manages, supervises, alters, controls or has responsibility for the operation of a storage tank.

   Out-of-service inspection—A scheduled aboveground storage tank inspection that encompasses both internal and external examination to determine tank system serviceability and compliance with requirements in this chapter and applicable industry standards. This inspection shall be conducted by a Department-certified aboveground storage tank inspector. The tank system may not be in operation during this inspection.

   Overfill—A release that occurs when a tank is filled beyond its capacity.

   Owner—Includes the following:

     (i)   In the case of a storage tank in use on August 7, 1989 or brought into use after August 7, 1989, a person who owns or has an ownership interest in a storage tank used for the storage, containment, use or dispensing of regulated substances.

     (ii)   In the case of an aboveground storage tank in use before August 7, 1989, but which was no longer in use on August 7, 1989, a person who owned the aboveground tank immediately before the discontinuance of its use as well as a person who meets the definition in subparagraph (i).

     (iii)   In the case of an underground storage tank, the owner of an underground storage tank holding regulated substances on or after November 8, 1984, and the owner of an underground storage tank at the time all regulated substances were removed when removal occurred prior to November 8, 1984.

   Permanently affixed—Not able to be moved from its resting place by design or which is connected to real property by piping or other structure.

   Permanent water supply—A well, interconnection with a public water supply, extension of a public water supply, similar water supply or a treatment system, determined by the Department to be capable of restoring the water supply to the quantity and quality of the original unaffected water supply.

   Person—An individual, partnership, corporation, association, joint venture, consortium, institution, trust, firm, joint-stock company, cooperative enterprise, municipality, municipal authority, Federal Government or agency, Commonwealth Department, agency, board, commission or authority, or other legal entity which is recognized by law as the subject of rights and duties. In provisions of the act prescribing a fine, imprisonment or penalty, or a combination thereof, the term includes the officers and directors of a corporation or other legal entity having officers and directors.

   Petroleum system—A storage tank system that primarily contains petroleum, and may contain additives or other regulated substances. The term includes systems containing motor fuels, jet fuels, distillate fuel oils, residual fuel oils, lubricants, petroleum solvents and used oils.

   Pipe or piping—A hollow cylinder or tubular conduit that is constructed of nonearthen materials. The terms include the associated fittings such as unions, elbows, tees and flexible joints.

   Pipeline facilities (including gathering lines)—New and existing pipe rights-of-way and associated equipment, facilities or buildings regulated under the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 or the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968, codified without substantive change in 1994 by Pub. L. No. 103-272, 108 Stat. 1371 (49 U.S.C.A. § §  60101—60125) which may include coastal, interstate or intrastate pipelines.

     (i)   The term includes tanks essential to the operation of the pipeline, such as tanks used to hold substances that operate compressors or pumps directly connected to the pipeline and breakout tanks used solely to relieve pressure surges from the pipeline and then reinject substances from the pipeline back into the pipeline.

     (ii)   The term does not include tanks which dispense substances to vehicles, railcars, barge or tanker truck transports or tanks at complex facilities which serve as storage tanks or feed stock tanks for the purposes of this chapter.

   Potential to be affected—In the context of water supplies, a water supply that, by virtue of its location with respect to a release of regulated substances, is reasonably likely to be impacted by that release, based on an evaluation of the known physical and hydrogeologic environment in which the release occurred and the fate and transport properties of the contaminants released.

   Pressure vessel—A vessel used in industrial processes designed to withstand pressures above 15 psig.

   Process vessel—A vessel in industrial or commercial operation in which, during use, there is a mechanical, physical or chemical change of the contained substances taking place. The industrial or commercial process may include, but is not limited to, mixing, separating, chemically altering, dehydrating, extracting, refining or polishing of the substances in the tank. The term does not include tanks used only to store substances prior to sale or to store feedstock prior to additional processing.

   Property—A parcel of land defined by the metes and bounds set forth in the deed for that land.

   Public water system—A system which provides water to the public for human consumption which has at least 15 service connections or regularly serves an average of at least 25 individuals daily at least 60 days out of the year. The term includes collection, treatment, storage and distribution facilities under control of the operator of the system and used in connection with the system. The term includes collection or pretreatment storage facilities not under control of the operator which are used in connection with the system. The term also includes a system which provides for bottling or bulk hauling for human consumption. Water for human consumption includes water that is used for drinking, bathing and showering, cooking, dishwashing or maintaining oral hygiene.

   Reconstruction—The work necessary to reassemble a storage tank that has been dismantled and relocated to a new site.

   Regulated substance

     (i)   An element, compound, mixture, solution or substance that, when released into the environment, may present substantial danger to the public health, welfare or the environment which is one of the following:

       (A)   A substance defined as a hazardous substance in section 101(14) of CERCLA, including hazardous substances that are liquid or gaseous, or suspended therein regardless of holding temperature, but not including a substance regulated as a hazardous waste under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 U.S.C.A. § §  6921—6931).

       (B)   Petroleum, including crude oil or a fraction thereof and petroleum hydrocarbons which are liquid at standard conditions of temperature and pressure (60° F and 14.7 pounds per square inch absolute), including, but not limited to, oil, petroleum, petroleum mixed with ethanol, fuel oil, oil sludge, oil refuse, oil mixed with other nonhazardous wastes and crude oils, gasoline and kerosene.

       (C)   Other substances determined by the Department by regulation whose containment, storage, use or dispensing may present a hazard to the public health and safety or the environment, but not including gaseous substances used exclusively for the administration of medical care. This includes the following other regulated substances:

         (I)   Nonpetroleum oils including biodiesel; synthetic fuels and oils, such as silicone fluids; tung oils and wood-derivative oils, such as resin/rosin oils; and inedible seed oils from plants, which are liquid at standard conditions of temperature and pressure. The requirements in this chapter for petroleum tanks in clause (B) apply for this group of substances.

         (II)   Pure ethanol intended for blending with motor fuel. The requirements in this chapter for petroleum tanks in clause (B) apply.

   Release—Spilling, leaking, emitting, discharging, escaping, leaching or disposing from a storage tank into surface waters and groundwaters of this Commonwealth or soils or subsurface soils in an amount equal to or greater than the reportable released quantity determined under section 102 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C.A. §  9602), and regulations promulgated thereunder, or an amount equal to or greater than a discharge as defined in section 311 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C.A. §  1321) and regulations promulgated thereunder. The term also includes spilling, leaking, emitting, discharging, escaping, leaching or disposing from a storage tank into a containment structure or facility that poses an immediate threat of contamination of the soils, subsurface soils, surface water or groundwater.

   Release detection—The determination, through a method or combination of methods, whether a release of a regulated substance has occurred from a storage tank into the environment or into the interstitial space between the storage tank and its secondary containment around it.

   Remediation standard—The background, Statewide health or site-specific standard, or any combination thereof, as provided for in the Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (35 P. S. § §  6026.101—6026.909).

   Removal—Activities involving removal of storage tank system components, ancillary equipment and appurtenances. The term includes removal from service activities when a storage tank or storage tank system is removed, but excludes site assessment activities.

   Removal from service—The term includes the following:

     (i)   Activities related to rendering an underground storage tank system permanently unserviceable. Activities include the oversight of the proper draining and cleaning of the storage tank system of product liquids, vapors, accumulated sludges or solids, and completing one of the following:

       (A)   Leaving the storage tank system in the ground and filling the tank with inert, solid material.

       (B)   Dismantling or removing the storage tank system from the tank site.

     (ii)   Discontinued use, abandonment, closure in place and permanent closure but does not include temporary closure as those terms are used in the act.

     (iii)   Site assessment activities required under Subchapter E (relating to technical standards for underground storage tanks) and applicable State law, which are the responsibility of owners and operators, but are not conducted by certified installers or inspectors.

   Reportable release—A quantity or an unknown quantity of regulated substance released to or posing an immediate threat to surface water, groundwater, bedrock, soil or sediment. The term does not include the following, if the owner or operator has control over the release, the release is completely contained and, within 24 hours of the release, the total volume of the release is recovered or removed in the corrective action:

     (i)   A release to the interstitial space of a double-walled aboveground or underground storage tank.

     (ii)   A release of petroleum to an aboveground surface that is less than 25 gallons.

     (iii)   A release of a hazardous substance to an aboveground surface that is less than its reportable quantity under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C.A. § §  9601—9675) and 40 CFR Part 302 (relating to designation, reportable quantities, and notification).

   Residential tank—A tank located on property used primarily for dwelling purposes.

   Responsible party—A person who is responsible or liable for corrective action under the act. The term includes: the owner or operator of a storage tank; the landowner or occupier; a person who on or after August 5, 1990, knowingly sold, distributed, deposited or filled an underground storage tank regulated by the act which never held a valid registration, with a regulated substance; and a person who on or after August 5, 1990, knowingly sold, distributed, deposited or filled an unregistered aboveground storage tank regulated by the act, with a regulated substance, prior to the discovery of the release.

   Risk assessment—A process to quantify the risk posed by exposure of a human or ecological receptor to regulated substances. The term includes baseline risk assessment, development of site-specific standards and risk assessment of the remedial alternatives.

   SARA—The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, the act of October 17, 1986 (Pub.L. No. 99-499, 101 Stat. 1613).

   Secondary containment—An additional layer of impervious material creating a space in which a release of a regulated substance from a storage tank may be detected before it enters the environment.

   Sediment—Solid fragmental material that originates from weathering of rocks and is transported or deposited by air, water or ice, or that accumulates by other natural agents, such as chemical precipitation from solution or secretion by organisms, and that forms in layers on the earth’s surface at ordinary temperatures in a loose, unconsolidated form. The term includes sand, gravel, silt, mud, till, loess and alluvium.

   Septic tank—A watertight covered receptacle designed to receive or process, through liquid separation or biological digestion, the sewage discharged from a building sewer.

   Site—For purposes of §  245.303(c) and (d) (relating to general requirements), the term means the property which includes the storage tank facility. For other purposes, the term means the extent of contamination originating within the property boundaries and all areas in close proximity to the contamination necessary for the implementation of remedial activities to be conducted.

   Small aboveground storage tank—An aboveground storage tank having a capacity equal to or less than 21,000 gallons.

   Soil—Unconsolidated materials above bedrock.

   Solid Waste Management Act—The Solid Waste Management Act (35 P. S. § §  6018.101—6018.1003).

   Spill prevention response plan—Emergency plans and procedures developed by an aboveground storage tank or tank facility owner, operator, or both, for response to an accident or spill on the facility by facility personnel or contractors.

   Stationary tank—An aboveground storage tank that is permanently affixed to the real property on which the tank is located.

   Storage tank—An aboveground or underground storage tank which is used for the storage of a regulated substance.

   Storage tank facility—One or more stationary tanks, including associated intrafacility pipelines, fixtures, monitoring devices and other equipment. A facility may include aboveground tanks, underground tanks or a combination of both. For the purposes of the act and this part, the associated intrafacility pipelines, fixtures, monitoring devices and other equipment for an aboveground storage tank shall be that which lies within the emergency containment area. The term storage tank facility does not encompass portions of a facility that do not contain storage tank systems.

   Storage tank system—An underground or aboveground storage tank, associated underground or aboveground piping directly serving that storage tank, and one or more of the following which are directly associated with that storage tank:

     (i)   Ancillary equipment.

     (ii)   Foundation.

     (iii)   Containment structure or facility.

     (iv)   Corrosion protection system.

     (v)   Release detection system.

     (vi)   Spill and overfill protection system.

   Stormwater or wastewater collection system—Piping, pumps, conduits and other equipment necessary to collect and transport the flow of surface water runoff resulting from precipitation or domestic, commercial or industrial wastewater to and from retention areas or the areas where treatment is designated to occur. The collection of stormwater and wastewater does not include treatment except where incidental to conveyance.

   Substantial modification—An activity to construct, refurbish, restore or remove from service an existing storage tank, piping or storage tank facility which alters the physical construction or integrity of the storage tank or storage tank facility.

   Surface impoundment—A natural topographic depression, manmade excavation or diked area formed primarily of earthen materials, although it may be lined with man-made materials, that is not an injection well.

   Survey—For purposes of §  245.303(d), the term means a study to establish background for surface water, groundwater, soil and sediment prior to the use of a storage tank facility.

   Tank—A stationary device designed to contain an accumulation of regulated substances and constructed of nonearthen materials, for example, concrete, steel or plastic that provide structural support.

   Tank handling activities—Activities to install, modify or remove all or part of a storage tank system or storage tank facility. The term does not include maintenance activities.

   Temporary water supply—Bottled water, a water tank supplied by a bulk water hauling system and similar water supplies in quantities sufficient to accommodate normal usage.

   Third party liability—Liability of an owner or operator of an underground storage tank to a person for bodily injury or property damage, or both, arising from or caused by a sudden or nonsudden release of a regulated substance from the underground storage tank.

   Tightness testing activities—Testing activities which are designed and intended to detect leaks when performing precision tests, volumetric and nonvolumetric tests on underground storage tank systems.

   USTIB—Underground Storage Tank Indemnification Board—The Board established under section 703 of the act (35 P. S. §  6021.703), and authorized to carry out the powers and duties described in section 705 of the act (35 P. S. §  6021.705).

   USTIF—Underground Storage Tank Indemnification Fund—The Fund established under section 704 of the act (35 P. S. §  6021.704), for the purpose of making payments to the owner or operator of an underground storage tank who incurs corrective action liability or third party liability caused by a sudden or nonsudden release from an underground storage tank.

   USTIF deductible—The portion of liability incurred by an owner or operator of an underground storage tank for corrective action or for third party liability, within the limits of liability for USTIF coverage, which is the responsibility of the owner or operator and which is not indemnified by USTIF coverage. The USTIF deductible amount is established or revised by USTIB in accordance with section 705(c) of the act.

   Underground area—An underground room, such as a basement, cellar, shaft or vault, providing enough space for physical inspection of the exterior of the tank situated on or above the surface of the floor.

   Underground field constructed storage tank—An underground storage tank that is manufactured from metallic or nonmetallic materials and has final assembly completed at the job site. The term does not include associated piping.

   Underground manufactured storage tank—An underground storage tank that is manufactured from metallic or nonmetallic materials and is completely fabricated and assembled in the shop prior to shipping. The term does not include associated piping.

   Underground storage tank—One or a combination of tanks (including underground pipes connected thereto) which are used, were used or will be used to contain an accumulation of regulated substances, and the volume of which (including the volume of underground pipes connected thereto) is 10% or more beneath the surface of the ground. The term includes tanks being constructed or installed for regulated use. The term does not include:

     (i)   Farm or residential tanks of 1,100 gallons or less capacity used for storing motor fuel for noncommercial purposes.

     (ii)   Tanks used for storing heating oil for consumptive use on the premises where stored unless they are specifically required to be regulated by Federal law.

     (iii)   A septic or other subsurface sewage treatment tank.

     (iv)   A pipeline facility (including gathering lines) regulated under:

       (A)   The Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968.

       (B)   The Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979.

     (v)   An interstate or intrastate pipeline facility regulated under State laws comparable to the provisions of law in subparagraph (iv).

     (vi)   Surface impoundments, pits, ponds or lagoons.

     (vii)   Stormwater or wastewater collection systems.

     (viii)   Flow-through process tanks.

     (ix)   Liquid traps or associated gathering lines directly related to oil or gas production and gathering operations.

     (x)   Storage tanks situated in an underground area (such as a basement, cellar, mine working, drift, shaft or tunnel) if the tank is situated upon or above the surface of the floor.

     (xi)   Tanks regulated under the Solid Waste Management Act, including, but not limited to, piping, tanks, collection and treatment systems used for leachate, methane gas and methane gas condensate management, except for tanks subject to 40 CFR Part 280 (relating to technical standards and corrective action requirements for owners and operators of underground storage tanks (UST)).

     (xii)   An underground storage tank system with capacity of 110 gallons or less.

     (xiii)   Tanks containing radioactive materials or coolants that are regulated under The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C.A. § §  2011—2297).

     (xiv)   A wastewater treatment tank system.

     (xv)   Equipment or machinery that contains regulated substances for operational purposes such as hydraulic lift tanks and electrical equipment tanks.

     (xvi)   An underground storage tank system that contains a de minimis concentration of regulated substances.

     (xvii)   An emergency spill or overflow containment underground storage tank system that is expeditiously emptied after use.

     (xviii)   An underground storage tank system that is part of an emergency generator system at nuclear power generation facilities regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix A (relating to general design criteria for nuclear power plants).

     (xix)   Other tanks excluded by policy or regulations promulgated under the act.

   Underground storage tank system—An underground storage tank, connected piping and ancillary equipment and containment system.

   Underground vault—A structure which is beneath the surface of the ground and is designed specifically to contain an aboveground storage tank.

   Unregistered storage tank—A storage tank, regulated under the act, which does not hold a current, valid registration.

   Upgrade—The addition or retrofit of some systems such as cathodic protection, lining or spill and overfill controls to improve the ability of a storage tank system to prevent the release of product.

   Wastewater treatment tank—A tank that is designed to receive and treat an influent wastewater through physical, chemical or biological methods.

   Water supply—Existing, designated or planned sources of water or facilities or systems for the supply of water for human consumption or for agricultural, commercial, industrial or other legitimate use, protected by the applicable water supply provisions of §  93.3 (relating to protected water uses).

Source

   The provisions of this §  245.1 amended December 23, 1994, effective December 24, 1994, 24 Pa.B. 6515; amended September 27, 1996, effective September 28, 1996, 26 Pa.B. 4735; amended October 10, 1997, effective October 11, 1997, 27 Pa.B. 5341; amended February 27, 1998, effective October 11, 1997, 28 Pa.B. 1135; amended November 30, 2001, effective December 1, 2001, 31 Pa.B. 6615; corrected November 29, 2002, effective February 2, 2002, 32 Pa.B. 5883; amended November 9, 2007, effective November 10, 2007, 37 Pa.B. 5979. Immediately preceding text appears at serial pages (317226), (285707) to (285716), (294471) to (294474) and (313731) to (313732).

Cross References

   This section cited in 25 Pa. Code §  245.231 (relating to scope); 25 Pa. Code §  245.403 (relating to applicability); 25 Pa. Code §  298.1 (relating to definitions); 25 Pa. Code §  245.505 (relating to applicability); 25 Pa. Code §  245.605 (relating to applicability); and 25 Pa. Code §  977.4 (relating to definitions).



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